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Supported by Nominet

Circle of trust

Use these fun icebreaker games to consider who we trust with our personal information.

You will need

  • Something to mark lines (for example, chalk, masking tape, or rope)
  • Hula hoops
  • Beanbags

Before you begin

  • The person leading the activity should mark out a line where everyone will throw their beanbags from.
  • Place four markers extending from the line in one metre intervals. For example, one marker will be one metre from the line; the next marker will be two metres from the line and so on.

Who knows me?

  1. The person leading the activity should explain that you will be exploring how well different people in our lives know us.
  2. Everyone should be instructed to stand on the throwing line.
  3. Explain that participants will be given bean bags which will represent different people in their lives. Identify each of the four markers that you placed at metre intervals from the throwing line, to the group and explain that they represent how well someone knows you. Each marker represents one of the following statements; very well, quite well, a little bit and not at all. You can decide in your group which marker represents each statement.
  4. Explain that participants will be given a beanbag that will represent different people in their lives. Everyone should now be given a beanbag.
  5. Explain that the person leading the activity will call out someone in the participant’s lives and the group need to throw their beanbag to the marker that represents how well they know the person or people mentioned
  6. The person leading the activity should now give an example of someone in the participant’s lives.

  7. After a count of three, everyone should throw their beanbag to the marker that they think is true to them.
  8. Everyone should then retrieve their beanbag and return to the throwing line.
  9. Repeat step 5-6 with different people represented via the beanbags.

Who can I trust?

  1. Everyone should feel more certain on how well different people in their lives know them.
  2. The person leading the activity should explain that the beanbags will now represent different pieces of information about the participants, and they must now decide who they would be ok with knowing that information about them.

  3. Everyone should be given a beanbag and instructed to stand at the throwing point.
  4. After a count of three, everyone should throw their beanbag to their chosen distance of how well someone knows them.
  5. Everyone should then retrieve their beanbag and return to the throwing point.
  6. Repeat steps 3-6 with different people represented via the beanbags.

Reflection

This activity helped everyone to live healthily by keeping themselves safe. There are lots of important things in people’s lives, but they don’t need to share everything with everyone. They can choose which bits of life they share and who they share them with. What would happen if people, were online and someone they didn’t know asked them a personal question such as where they lived or what their phone number was? Hopefully, everyone will remember that they shouldn’t share this information and tell a trusted adult. What should people do before they share information about, or photos of, someone online? They should always ask permission – people should check with a trusted adult before they say ‘yes’, and it’s always OK for anyone to say ‘no’ politely and firmly.

Deciding what to share online is all about assessing risk; it’s a great skill to learn and one we use all the time, just like when you plan what first aid kit you need if you’re going on a hike. At Scouts we also have our Yellow Card so that everyone knows the actions they can take to keep each other safe in person or online. Remind everyone that if they’re ever nervous, scared, or unsure about anything they see online they should always talk to an adult they trust.

Safety

All activities must be safely managed. Use the safety checklist to help you plan and risk assess your activity. Do a risk assessment and take appropriate steps to reduce risk. Always get approval for the activity and have suitable supervision and an InTouch process.

Active games

The game area should be free of hazards. Explain the rules of the game clearly and have a clear way to communicate that the game must stop when needed.

Online safety

Supervise young people when they’re online and give them advice about staying safe.

For more support around online safety or bullying, check out the NSPCC website. If you want to know more about specific social networks and games, Childnet has information and safety tips for apps. You can also report anything that’s worried you online to the Child Exploitation and Online Protection command.

As always, if you’ve got concerns about a young person’s welfare (including their online experiences), follow the Yellow Card reporting processes.