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Every picture tells a story

They say that ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’. Share your photos and your thoughts so everyone can learn more.
Plan a session with this activity

You will need

  • Camera or phone
  • Device for showing or printing photographs
How to take great photos
PDF – 80.8KB

Before you begin

It’s up to you whether you do this activity during a meeting or at home—we’ve included instructions for both options. Whichever option you choose, don’t forget to share them at the end, whether it’s with your family or at a meeting.

Take photos during a meeting

  1. Split into pairs or small groups.
  1. Each group should think about the theme of ‘our community’, and talk about objects or scenes that represent it. They should talk about how they could take photographs of their ideas.
  1. Everyone should take at least 10 photographs related to the theme. They may want to use the ‘How to take great photos’ sheet to remind themselves how to get the perfect shot, but it’s OK to explore and experiment as well.
  2. The person leading the activity should get the photos ready to share in the next session. They may want to show them on a phone or tablet, or they could print them out.

Take photos at home with a parent or carer

  1. Everyone should think about the theme of ‘our community’ and talk to a parent, carer, or friend about objects or a scene that represents it—and how this could be photographed.
  1. Everyone should take at least 10 photographs related to the theme. They may want to use the ‘How to take great photos’ sheet to remind themselves how to get the perfect shot, but it’s OK to explore and experiment as well.
  1. Everyone should show their photos to a parent or carer and explain why they chose those shots and what they like about them.
  2. If the person leading the activity told them to, everyone should send them their photos (or print them out) so they can share them with their friends at a meeting.

Share the photos and enjoy them together

  1. Everyone should share their photos.
  1. Everyone should explain why they chose to take each picture, what they like about it, and one thing they’ve learned about photography.
  2. If there’s time, everyone else should share what they like about each other’s photos.

Reflection

This activity helped you to develop the skill of photography. What was the one thing you said you learned? Can you remember what other people learned, and did you learn that too? The person leading the activity may help you remember technical skills such as staying still, keeping the light behind you, and choosing when to zoom. Don’t forget, the best way to keep building on this skill is to keep practising.

This activity was also a chance to communicate. Photos are a way to communicate—you’ve used a picture to share a feeling or concept with other people! Do you think it’s powerful to use a photograph as well as (or instead of) words? How did you share why you chose to take each picture and what you liked about them? Was it easy or difficult to explain? Did you understand other people’s answers?

Safety

Phones and cameras

Make sure parents and carers are aware and have given consent for photography.

All activities must be safely managed. Do a risk assessment and take appropriate steps to reduce risk. Always get approval for the activity and have suitable supervision and an InTouch process.