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A Guide for the Group Treasurer

About the role

Introduction

This resource is designed to help the role of Group Treasurer. It should not be seen as a technical guide, but should point you in the right direction when getting started in the role.

If you are reading this, you have probably taken on (or are considering taking on) this role and are looking for guidance and further information. It's the aim of this resource to provide you with advice and support for you in your role. Other members of the Group (such as the Group Scout Leader, or adults who wish to understand the role of the Group Treasurer) may also find it useful.

The ‘Key Parts of the role’ section has been divided using a numerical system, based on feedback from local Treasurers, for ease of use.

Policy, Organisation and Rules of The Scout Association is referred to as POR. It contains the up-to-date rules of The Scout Association.

Read the latest updates to POR.

Read the Scottish variations from POR.

This resource assumes that the constitution of the Group follows the ideal constitution as described in POR, Rule 3.23. Your Group Chair or Group Scout Leader will have further details of your Group’s constitution and will be able to tell you if it varies from POR. As Group Treasurer you are a trustee of the Scout Group. We advise Group trustees to refer to their constitution regularly to remind themselves what the charity’s purposes are and how it should be run. Each trustee should be given a full copy of the constitution on appointment, particularly if it varies from POR.

The Group Treasurer’s role

The role description will vary but the following are the key duties of the Group Treasurer:

  • Be a trustee of the Scout Group.
  • Act as treasurer to the Group Scout Council.
  • Act as treasurer to the Group Executive Committee.
  • Work closely with and support the Group Chair and Group Scout Leader.
  • Agree the annual budget for the Scout Group.
  • Provide sound administration in respect of the obligations according to POR.
  • Ensure that any financial reports required by the District are submitted on time.
  • Ensure you complete your Scout Group’s Annual Return and Annual Report and Accounts and file with the relevant authorities, in accordance with guidelines in the Statement of Recommended Practice issued by the relevant charity regulator. Charities in England & Wales with a total annual income exceeding £10,000 are under a legal duty to prepare and submit the Annual Return to the Charity Commission for England & Wales.
  • Send completed Annual Scout Group Accounts to the District Treasurer within 14 days of the AGM.
  • Receive all monies on behalf of the Scout Group, keep up-to-date accounts of all funds and make payments on the authorisation of the Group Executive Committee.
  • Receive individual Group membership fees and make payments to the District Treasurer as determined by the District Executive Committee.
  • Maintain effective communication with the District Treasurer.
  • Be the lead for the Scout Group regarding banking, taxation and audit/examination/scrutiny.
  • Be an active member of the Group Executive Committee.
  • Work with the Executive Committee to attract funding/grants/income/Gift Aid to the Group.
  • Ensure compliance with finance regulations.
  • Maintain a record of Group accounts and accounting records.

How did you become the Group Treasurer?

In functional terms:

  • You were elected as Group Treasurer by members of the Group Scout Council.
  • The election was then approved by the Group Scout Council at its annual general meeting.

What are you the Treasurer of?

You are Treasurer of, and report to, the Group Scout Council and the Group Executive Committee. As such you are a trustee of a charity with associated legal responsibilities (for more information see guidance from the charity regulators).

The Group Scout Council is the electoral body which supports the Scouts locally in the Scout Group. The Group Executive Committee are accountable to the Group Scout Council.

In reality the Group Scout Council meets just once a year. This meeting, the Annual General Meeting (AGM) must be held within six months of the Group’s financial year end. It receives annual reports and independently checked accounts and sets up the Group Executive Committee (the Charity Trustees) for the following year.

Membership of the Group Scout Council is open to all adults with appointments in the Group, as well as the parents of youth members in the Group and Patrol Leaders. Other supporters, including former Scouts and their parents, may be admitted to the Group Scout Council. It's highly desirable, to include all of those who support the Group. For full details, please refer POR Rule 3.23a.

How does the Scout Group work?

The Group Scout Leader is the volunteer manager of the Scout Group. They are responsible for providing leadership and support to every adult and young person involved in the Group.

The Group Chair and the Group Executive Committee support the Group Scout Leader and ensure the effective administration of the Scout Group. The Group Scout Leader nominates the Group Chair and the relationship should be one of partnership and mutual support.

The Group Executive Committee aims to make sure that the Scout Group has the facilities and resources needed to deliver good Scouting in the Group.

The leaders in the Group work as a team to perform a variety of roles and deliver an exciting and attractive programme of activities for young people in the Group. Their work is co-ordinated through the Group Scouters’ meeting (chaired by the Group Scout Leader), which includes the section leaders and assistants.

The Group Treasurer works closely with the Group Chair and the Group Scout Leader to ensure the successful management of Group funds and investments.