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Supported by WWF

Press play and go: guerrilla gardening

Spread wildflowers and encourage wildlife with homemade seed bombs, then share them far and wide.
Plan a session with this activity

You will need

  • Mixing bowls
  • Something to protect surfaces (for example, newspaper or tablecloths)
  • Gardening gloves
  • Meadow flower seeds (or seeds or flower heads collected from the garden)
  • Peat-free compost
  • Powdered clay (found in craft shops)
  • Cups
  • Mixing spoons
  • Aprons
Script for leaders (Guerrilla gardening)
PDF – 75.9KB
From grey to green
PDF – 304.4KB

Start the meeting

You’ve probably developed your own routines to start online Scout meetings, but here are some ideas:

  • It’s a good idea to start with something familiar to help everyone get into the Scouts mindset and to reassure them that it’s still Scouts – it just looks a little different right now. This may mean an innovative flag break or a virtual Grand Howl.
  • Why not give everyone the chance to chat to their friends? Online meetings don’t always give people to chance to reconnect; giving everyone the chance to catch up at the start helps everyone get engaged and makes it more likely that they’ll feel comfortable speaking up throughout the session. Ask everyone to tell you something good about their week or answer a question like ‘what’s your favourite plant or flower?’. Don’t forget to use the mute button so everyone can hear the person speaking.
  • You could get stuck into a quiz or focusing game to capture everyone’s attention and help them focus on the activity. You could try Scattergories.

Do the activity

It’s up to you whether you play the video where Gabe talks everyone through each step or whether you play the video without a presenter. We’ve included some ideas for what you could say if you decide to present it yourself.

Whichever video you choose, feel free to pause the video as often as you need to let everyone catch up, share their top tips, or help each other problem solve.

If you'd like to make this video full screen on a desktop, double click on the video once you have pressed play.

If you would like to download this video, or play it full screen on mobile, you can watch the video directly on Vimeo.

If you would like to see the video without the presenter, this is also available on our Vimeo.

This activity helps contribute towards some of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. Find out more about the SDGs, and how Scouts across the world are getting involved.

Reflection

You probably have your own ways of reflecting and ending meetings and you can borrow questions and ideas from the original activity too.

In this activity, people had the chance to value the outdoors and care about the impact of their actions. Think about whether your reflections help young people understand what they’ve learned during the activity. The whole point of reflecting is that it helps everyone think about what they’ve learned and how they could apply it to other situations in future.

Are people comfortable sharing their ideas during the reflection? No one should feel put on the spot or forced to talk, but it’s good to give everyone a chance to have their say. You may want to revisit how you start your meetings to get everyone used to speaking up.

It’s worth giving people the chance to share what they’ve created during the reflection. It’s always nice to see what everyone’s made, but sharing their work will also help them describe the activity in their own way and make it more memorable.  

It’s also useful to chat about how people could take it further. You could think about how people could build on what they’ve learned or set them a simple, creative challenge before your next session. For this activity, you could think about how else people could help local wildlife in their local community – maybe they could build bird houses or bug hotels or take action against litter or pollution. If you set a challenge, don’t forget to check in when you next meet.

Safety

All activities must be safely managed. Use the safety checklist to help you plan and risk assess your activity. Do a risk assessment and take appropriate steps to reduce risk. Always get approval for the activity and have suitable supervision and an InTouch process.

Gardening and nature

Everyone must wash their hands after the activity has finished. Wear gloves if needed. Explain how to safely use equipment and set clear boundaries so everyone knows what’s allowed.

Water games and activities

Be careful when doing activities with, in, or near water. Check surfaces and reduce the risk of slipping where possible. Make sure you have appropriate supervision for this activity.