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Deal or no deal

First suggested by 1st Bramhall Scouts
Take it in turns to open boxes and catch up with your friends. Will you accept the banker’s offer?
Plan a session with this activity

You will need

  • Device with access to the internet
  • Scrap paper
  • Pens or pencils
  • Envelopes

Before you begin  

  • This is a great activity to run during an online session. Check out the advice on using Zoom and other popular digital platforms and the guidance on being safe online.
  • Write down the names of all of the young people. Give them a box number and an amount of money. You can find the amounts used in Deal or no deal on Wikipedia, but you could just make up your own.
  • Contact parents and carers, let them know that you’ll be playing a version of Deal or no deal, and explain that you need their help to prepare. Tell them which box number their young person will have and ask them to write it on an envelope. Tell them an amount of money to write on a scrap of paper and ask them to seal it inside the envelope. Make sure they know to keep the amount of money secret! If people don’t have envelopes, they could make a basic one by folding a piece of paper in half and gluing all three sides shut.
  • You may want to invite everyone to watch an episode of Deal or no deal online so they have an idea of how it works.
  • Make a document with the amounts of money you’ve handed out. It doesn’t matter what you use, as long as you can delete amounts one at a time. You could even write them on a piece of paper to cross out with a pen.

Introduce the game

  1. Once everyone’s arrived, the person leading the game should delete any amounts of money that aren’t in the game because people haven’t joined the meeting.
  2. The person leading the game should welcome everyone to Deal or no deal and ask them to mute themselves.
  3. The person leading the game should explain that Deal or no deal is a gameshow.
  1. Everyone should show that they have their envelopes by holding them up to the screen so everyone can see the number.
  2. The person leading the game should choose someone to be the contestant.
  3. The person leading the game should share their screen so everyone can see the amounts of money that are in play.

Round one

  1. Everyone should hold their envelopes up so the contestant can see them.
  2. The contestant should unmute themselves and let everyone know how they’re doing. They should choose an envelope to open by saying the number of the envelope and the name of the person holding it, then they should mute themselves again.
  3. The person holding the chosen envelope should unmute themselves and let everyone know how they’re doing. They should open their envelope and reveal how much money it contains.
  1. The person leading the game should delete that amount from the screen they’re sharing, as if it’s been revealed, it can’t be in the contestant’s envelope.
  2. The contestant should choose a second envelope. Like before, the person holding the envelope should let everyone know how they’re doing and reveal the contents of their envelope so the person leading the game can delete it from the screen.
  3. Once the contestant has opened five envelopes, the person leading the game should pretend to receive a phone call from the banker.
  1. The person leading the game should explain that the banker’s made an offer of an amount of money. 
  1. Everyone should advise the contestant what to do by typing ‘deal’ or ‘no deal’ in the chat. Should they accept the offer (even though their box may have more in it) or keep playing, risking finding out that their box is less valuable than they hoped?
  1. The person leading the game should ask ‘deal or no deal?’ and the contestant should answer.
  2. If the contestant answers ‘deal’, they win the amount of money the banker offered. They should open their envelope and see what it contains – did they win more because they took the deal? If the contestant answers ‘no deal’, play continues to round two.

The other rounds

  1. The contestant should choose an envelope. Like before, the person holding the envelope should let everyone know how they’re doing and reveal the contents of their envelope so the person leading the game can delete it from the screen.
  2. Once the contestant has opened another three envelopes, the person leading the game should pretend to receive a phone call from the banker.
  3. Like before, the person leading the game should explain the banker’s offer. Everyone should use the chat to advise the contestant, who should answer ‘deal’ or ‘no deal’.
  4. If the contestant says ‘no deal’, keep playing. The banker should call to make an offer after the contestant opens three envelopes.
  1. Everyone should keep playing until the contestant accepts a deal or opens all of the envelopes, revealing what they’ve won.

Reflection

This activity was all about making logical, informed decisions. As the contestant chose more envelopes to open, the person leading the game needed to work out an appropriate offer for the contestant and the contestant needed to weigh up whether they were best off taking the offer (‘deal’) or continuing to play (‘no deal’). How did the person leading the game decide on the amount to offer? Maybe they came up with an average sum of money based on the remaining envelopes, or perhaps they worked out how many of the remaining letters had low or high sums of money in them.

Did the contestant and players think that the offers were fair? Different people will have a different definition of a fair offer, so take some time to discuss which deals best reflected the sums of money in the remaining envelopes. Discussing how big decisions are made and deciding what things are worth are important skills that people use throughout their lives. People may end up negotiating the best deal on insurance or a mortgage or setting themselves a monthly budget for spending on categories like food, socialising, and entertainment.

Safety

Online safety

Supervise young people when they’re online and give them advice about staying safe.

For more support around online safety or bullying, check out the NSPCC website. If you want to know more about specific social networks and games, Childnet has information and safety tips for apps. You can also report anything that’s worried you online to the Child Exploitation and Online Protection command.

As always, if you’ve got concerns about a young person’s welfare (including their online experiences), follow the Yellow Card reporting processes.

All activities must be safely managed. Do a risk assessment and take appropriate steps to reduce risk. Always get approval for the activity and have suitable supervision and an InTouch process.